Celebrating New Year in Taipei

Dear readers and fellow bloggers,

I know I’ve been MIA for almost two months now; I’ve been enjoying and settling into local life in Taipei, travelling a bit within the country, meeting new local friends, participating in community events, volunteering etc. Of course learning Mandarin at the university is taking up a lot of my time; the course load is heavy, despite the part-time hours, and the pressure from my professor to perform at my best is intense. Within 4 months I progressed from Level 1 to Level 3. It’s definitely quick acceleration of learning. I hope to write about my Mandarin learning experience at some point this year when I complete it!

Since Christmas is not really celebrated in Taiwan (don’t be fooled by all the Christmas decorations displayed all over town especially inside or outside of department stores in Taipei; it’s all commercialized) I decided to fly over to Hong Kong for a few days to be with family when I found out that they would be there! 🙂 I’ve always heard that the Christmas lights are the best in Hong Kong and it’s a must-see (yes, it’s also commercialized like Taipei but hey, I’m with family during Christmas there!), so I’m thrilled that I finally got to see it in person and check that off my bucket list. The epic Christmas lights and decorations in Hong Kong did not disappoint at all.

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Night View of Christmas lights at Tsim Tsa Tsui Waterfront

 

Now that you’re updated on why I’ve been missing, I hope you’re all off to a phenomenal start this year already! 🙂

I would like to share with you two special New Year things I did in Taipei, and I think you should definitely add it to your own bucket list if you ever come! 😉

 

1. New Year’s Fireworks at Taipei 101

To welcome 2016, I checked off another bucket list item, which was to see the spectacular fireworks explode from Taipei 101 at the stroke of midnight. There are so many places throughout the city that you can see it (near Taipei 101 where a special free countdown concert is being held, hiking up a mountain to see it or just standing in a corner of a street with a good view etc.); it all depends on your preference: to see it far or near. Instead of waiting for hours outdoors like I did in NYC last year, this year I decided to join my new friends to see the fireworks from their apartment rooftop. It was definitely less crowded. The perspective was different but still very beautiful as I could see the whole city.

Tip: My friends and I discovered that the MRT Station Daan, exit 4 (street in front) has a very good view of Taipei 101.

Rumour (I also read it in the news) has  it that there will no longer be a fireworks extravaganza at Taipei 101 for next new year; however, according to locals I spoke to, they say this rumour happens every year and then there’s fireworks. I guess only time will tell…

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My cell phone camera does not take night time photos well especially if it’s far, so this photo of Taipei 101 fireworks close up is not mine. It’s shared graciously from a friend of a friend who saw it closer than I did.

 

After the fireworks ended, my friends and I decided to walk towards Taipei 101 (Xinyi area) to experience the crowd. To our delight, the party was still going on strong. Of course the bars, lounges and cafes were full to its capacity so they did not accept any newcomers. In fact, to our surprise, some places were closing down “early.” However, a lively night market was set up and it was fun to walk around to feel the crowd atmosphere and to buy some Taiwanese snacks (小吃) to eat. We stayed around the area till around 3:30am because we were extremely exhausted from a long day of school and then countdown. When we left, I can honestly tell you that the locals were still wide awake and socializing in every corner of the streets in this area, from sitting on available benches to just sitting on the ground.

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The night market by Taipei 101

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The sea of people roaming the streets after the fireworks, by Taipei 101

 

The city of Taipei did a very good job with security, cleaning up (we saw many cleaners on the streets cleaning) and providing public transportation. The MRT (subway system) was running for 24 hours that day to ensure everyone could go home. Other options to go home were using taxis, walking and using YouBikes. I used YouBike to go home with two very sweet friends who made sure I arrived home safe and sound before they headed home themselves. A big thank you to AE & CK, for starting my 2016 off on a positive and happy note, a reminder to always be kind, caring and thoughtful! ❤

 

2. Receiving Spring Scrolls from Xingtian Temple (宮) 

Many older locals tell me that the western New Year (January 1st) is only celebrated by the young people, which is evident from what I saw on the streets on January 1st. However, according to them, Lunar New Year is an integral part to Taiwanese culture so everyone celebrates it from young to old.

I learned a cool tradition and activity that you can do if you’re in Taipei before the Lunar New Year starts. Many locals go to the temples to receive free Spring Scrolls which they use to decorate their home for Lunar New Year. They are called “Spring” scrolls because Spring is the season that represents growth and a new beginning. Hence Lunar New Year welcomes the beginning of Spring.

One of my classmates told me about Xingtian Temple and that the Spring Scrolls were beautiful. As a result I went there with my language exchange friend to check out the temple and receive the scrolls.  According to both of them, many people line up to receive the scrolls, especially on weekends. True to their words, it seems as if the people entering the temple was never-ending. Although the line may seem long, it moves very fast; I think we only lined up for about half an hour before we got our scrolls.

To avoid the crowd, you can go during a weekday. They give out Spring Scrolls daily from 8:30-19:30 during this period before Lunar New Year.

It is very easy to get to Xingtian Temple. It has its own MRT station on the yellow line. It only takes about 10 minutes to walk to the temple from exit 3.

Below you’ll find some photos and descriptions of how I collected the Spring Scrolls:

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The long line to get the Spring Scrolls

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Temple volunteers ask each person which Spring Scroll they want, and you collect the ones you want from table to table, until you reach the end.

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I took some Spring scrolls that hold meaning for me; for example the one word on the red square piece of paper means “Spring” and the two words below it mean “peace”.  In the end a patient temple volunteer rolled all the scrolls for me and put them into a plastic bag for me to take home. According to my landlord, it is a nice gesture to leave a small donation before leaving the temple, as a token of appreciation, since the temple took time and effort to produce so many beautiful scrolls to give to everyone for free.

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Thank you for reading my long New Year post!

I’m looking forward to celebrating Lunar New Year in Taipei and will share with you how it’s celebrated here next month! 🙂

With love and gratitude, Violet

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2 thoughts on “Celebrating New Year in Taipei

    • Hi Charlotte! The course is by semester so 3 months per semester; I finished Fall semester and Winter semester and am now in New Zealand! I just finished my 200 hours yoga teacher training so I am now a certified yoga teacher!! 🙂 I chose Mandarin because it will definitely help me in my teaching career when I return to Canada; I can communicate with my students and their parents. Plus, I think Mandarin is becoming a very important language around the world; in my university, there are so many students from all around the world learning Mandarin! For example, arriving at Auckland Airport, I was pleasantly surprised that beside the English signs, there are Chinese words! And I can actually read them now too. 🙂

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